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Blackwater Valley River

Blackwater Valley River

Blackwater Valley River

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Blackwater ValleyThe Blackwater River in North Hampshire acts as the county boundary line between Hampshire, Surrey and Berkshire and forms the centre piece of the Blackwater Valley. It begins at Rowhill Nature Reserve, Aldershot and after 20 miles joins with the River Whitewater near Eversley. Over the last 200 years the river suffered from neglect and encroaching urbanisation. However in recent years much has been done to improve water quality and restore the environment and habitats along the river.

With its many watery habitats the Valley is one of the best areas in Britain to see dragonflies and damselflies – no less than 30 species have been recorded here. Over 200 bird species have been recorded at the Eversley gravel pit complex and there are strong populations of grassland butterflies and grasshoppers. Ongoing restoration and management is increasing the wildlife value of the Valley and nowhere is this more apparent that in the river itself.

Blackwater Valley Path The River Blackwater links all the valley and its facilities. Wildlife is returning, including the otter which has been absent for over 40 years. Fishing stocks are improving and the construction of the Blackwater Valley Path, long distance riverside path, has opened up much of the riverbank to enable everyone to enjoy its waterside landscape and links many wildlife sites and recreational facilities.

Because of its virtually flat terrain the Valley is ideal for walking, or visitors can try some water sports, horse riding or golf. The Valley also ranks as one of the best regions for coarse fishing in the country with almost 60 still waters.

The northern sections of the River Blackwater offer good fishing and are popular in the autumn as the river's flow increases. The types of fish that currently populate the water include: chub, roach, perch, dace, gudgeon and rudd. As you progress further downstream pike, barbel and even the occasional native brown trout may be caught.